May Seasonal Flavors

LOS ANGELES EXCLUSIVES

One of our favorite months here in LA… our weather is warm but not too hot, our produce is fresh but not too obligatorily fruity, and our ice cream perfectly refreshing. This month’s menu features some of our favorite flavors specific to Los Angeles in Spring including lots of flowers, lots of rhubarb, and lots of delicious.

Cherimoya Milk Sorbet
Desire is the other mother of invention. We have been working on this idea for a while—milk sorbet! What would it be like? What could it do? We just wanted to know. The milk sorbet is lighter in flavor and fat, so the flavors we add burst and dissipate more quickly, like firecrackers or pop rocks. But the milk still has body, so there’s a sherbety, gelato-ey feel. Marry this with a sweet, floral, creamy cherimoya (aka “custard apple”) and this is a unique opportunity to taste something you’ve never had before. We sourced cherimoyas from Sahu Subtropicals in Rainbow, California. Founded in 2009, Sahu is growing berries, avocados, blood oranges, guavas, and other delicious and tropical produce.

Rhubarb Crumble with Toasted Anise
Nostalgia holds hands with the promise of spring. Our grandma’s recipe for rhubarb crumble, reinterpreted with all the snap and exuberance of the season’s first rhubarb. Cooked slowly in orange juice and cinnamon, with a bit of anise toasted to a dark amber, and folded in with a toothsome, textured crumble, this is our celebratory toast to having made it through another winter. This time of year we love to get up early and forage at the excellent Los Angeles Farmers Market. The rhubarb is young, tender, and delicious.

Wildflower Honey with Ricotta Walnut Lace Cookies
Honey has seasons, too. It’s spring: the flowers are budding, the birds are singing, the bees are buzzing, and the honey is overflowing with floral deliciousness. Really, it’s brazen, in-your-face floral. We fold it into ice cream and it’s almost a tea-like steeping effect–a beautiful bloom of honey ice cream. Crumbles of lemony ricotta walnut lace cookies add a little bit of zest and snap and nuttiness to the experience. Massey Honey Co., our wonderful family-owned collaborator, is all about the “un.“ Unprocessed, unfiltered, unheated, and all that other unnecessary un-organic stuff. Their apiaries are located in the LA/Orange County area and their honeys are extracted by hand and simply strained. That’s it. Based in on the central coast, Rancho La Viña is exactly the kind of grower we love to find. The 2,800 acre ranch has been in the Baer family since the 1860s and some of the walnut trees are hundreds of years old.

Grand Poppy Sorbet with Spring Flowers
100% pure joy. Is life disappointing you because edible spring flowers are not embedded in all of your favorite foods? Here is your solution. A pale orange, sunshiny sorbet with a pleasant hint of Grand Poppy Organic Liqueur that’s chock-full of gorgeous edible spring flowers. This is one of our most difficult ice creams to make because we have to hand-place every flower into the ice cream, but man, is it beautiful: blue and white borage; purple, yellow, and orange violas; and bright pink rose petals decant playfulness and glee into your hopeful heart. Greenbar Craft Distillery has about a thousand cool stories to tell. They’re the first distillery in LA since prohibition; they only use amazing ingredients that are sourced within 100 miles of LA; they plant a tree for every bottle sold. As if that weren’t enough, they took it upon themselves to make this incredible aperitif-style Grand Poppy Organic Liqueur with citrus from SoCal, coastal herbs and berries, and, of course, the California poppy.

Honey Lavender
Sometimes you want to eat flowers. If you’ve ever had a Saint Bernard sort of lean into your person in a protective yet utterly loving way, his deep reserves of beast power evident but undeployed, that’s sort of what this lavender ice cream is like—epically strong, but also…courtly. This cult favorite is like nothing else on our menu. We take two pounds of California lavender flowers and steep them in honey and cream, bringing out an incredibly deep, almost smoky lavender color and a skull- thwacking punch of lavender followed by a sweet touch of honey on your tongue. It is our most divisive flavor.Central Coast Lavender Farm and Apothecary is based in Paso Robles and describes itself as a “modern day” organic lavender farm, distillery, and apothecary.

 

PORTLAND EXCLUSIVES

May in Portland is a rollercoaster rainy mornings with sunny afternoons, first of the season fresh produce, and flower lined streets. This month’s menu features some of our favorite flavors specific to Portland in Spring.

Rhubarb Crumble with Toasted Anise
Nostalgia holds hands with the promise of spring. Our grandma’s recipe for rhubarb crumble, reinterpreted with all the snap and exuberance of the season’s first rhubarb. Cooked slowly in orange juice and cinnamon, with a bit of anise toasted to a dark amber, and folded in with a toothsome, textured crumble, this is our celebratory toast to having made it through another winter. This time of year we love to get up early and forage at the excellent Portland Farmers Market. The rhubarb is young, tender, and delicious.

Wildflower Honey with Ricotta Walnut Lace Cookies
Honey has seasons, too. It’s spring: the flowers are budding, the birds are singing, the bees are buzzing, and the honey is overflowing with floral deliciousness. Really, it’s brazen, in-your-face floral. We fold it into ice cream and it’s almost a tea-like steeping effect–a beautiful bloom of honey ice cream. Crumbles of lemony ricotta walnut lace cookies add a little bit of zest and snap and nuttiness to the experience. We love Bee Local honey because it tastes like everything delicious in Oregon. Bee Local does a ton of education, community support, and direct trade, and they harvest their honey just south of Portland near the wine vineyards.

Strawberry Meadow Marmalade
You are bursting with song. Standing in a sunny, flowery alpine meadow, feeling not unlike Fraulein Maria in The Sound of Music, you wonder what this feeling might taste like. Here, try this: The star of the show is meadow jelly made with Steven Smith’s Meadow tea. With a touch of lemon and honey, it beams culinary rays of bright sunshine and flowers into this light, easy strawberry ice cream made with early Hood berries–you know, the ones that are all kind of goofy and homely this time of year. Steven Smith dedicated his heart and soul to creating incredible teas. His pioneering spirit and discerning palate and, most of all, his joyful creativity, shine through in his wonderful, complex, and delectable teas. We are using his Meadow tea for this ice cream, but you owe it to yourself to try them all.

Cherry Blossom
A cinematic, dreamlike snapshot of spring sunshine filtering through drifts of cherry blossoms. This ice cream is dedicated to that one day in spring when you turn the corner and are struck dumb at the sight of a storm of cherry blossoms caught in a breeze, creating a pink carpet for you to walk on, and demolishing, if only for a moment, all your dumb work stress. A light, milk-based ice cream, round and simple, infused with the taste of actual Japanese cherry blossoms. It is mystical. It is enchanting. You must.

Dandelion Sorbet
100% pure joy. Is life disappointing you because edible spring flowers are not embedded in all of your favorite foods? Here is your solution. A pale yellow, sunshiny sorbet with a pleasant hint of elderberry and dandelion wine that’s chock-full of gorgeous, edible spring flowers. This is one of our most difficult ice creams to make because we have to hand-place every flower into the ice cream, but man, is it beautiful: blue and white borage; purple, yellow, and orange violas; and bright pink rose petals decant playfulness and glee into your hopeful heart.